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RUST BELT BIENNIAL

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RUST BELT BIENNIAL

 
 

SORDONI GALLERY
Wilkes University

 

AUGUST 27th - OCTOBER 5th

OPENING RECEPTION, SEPTEMBER 7TH, 6-8PM

 
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We are thrilled to introduce the first RUST BELT BIENNIAL, a celebration of photography with work realized throughout the Rust Belt Region in all its manifestations.

This land, its people, the pride and the struggles, the patina of the past and above all, the histories and memories ingrained in the soil across the region. It is time to make new memories and new histories, while revisiting and reevaluating old ones; It is time to start a new dialogue about the state of photography and it’s social, cultural and political effects in our society; it is time to give back to the photographic community but also the region; it is time for you to join us!

For our an inaugural Biennial we are grateful to have
Andrew L. Moore as competition juror.

We are honored to collaborate with the Sordoni Gallery at Wilkes University, in Wilkes-Barre, Penn., where the Biennial will be held from August 27th to October 5th of 2019 with an opening reception Saturday, Sept. 7th, 6-8pm. Additional information regarding dates of the main exhibition with lectures and presentations will be published in the Spring.

 
 

PARTNERS & SPONSORS

 

 

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THE EXHIBITION

AUGUST 27TH - OCTOBER 6TH

This land, its people, the pride and the struggles, the patina of the past and above all, the histories and memories ingrained in the soil across the region inspired Niko J. Kallianiotis and Yoav Friedlander to form a new venue to celebrate and focus on photographic work from the region,
RUST BELT BIENNIAL, featuring curated work of Rust Belt artists alongside prize winners and a top selection from the Biennial’s open call for work made in the region, juried by renowned photographer Andrew L. Moore.

 
 
 

OPENING RECEPTION

SEPTEMBER 7TH | 6 – 8 PM

Join us for the opening of the very first Rust Belt Biennial. The show will feature the work of Curated Artists: Andrew Wertz, Anna Beeke, Costa Sakellariou, Dave Jordano, Edmund Eckstein, Jeffrey Stockbridge, Kathleen Gerber, Lauren Davies, Lauren Orchowski, Lisa Elmaleh, Lori Nix, Luke Wynne And Michael Froio.
The Juried Show Finalists: Alyssha Eve Csük, David Bernstein, David Obermeyer, Emily Najera, Eric Kunsman, Frank E. Schoonover, Hans Gindlesberger, Joel Anderson, John Lusis, John Sanderson, John Wyatt, Kylie West, Parker Reinecker, Peter Essick, Raymond Thompson Jr, Scott Houston, Susan Copich, Tom Lamb and the Competition Winners: Matthew Abbott, Allison Nichols and Mike Majewski.

 
 
 

PANEL DISCUSSION

SEPTEMBER 11TH | 5 PM

Yoav Friedlander, Niko J. Kallianiotis, Ed Eckstein, founding member of Frame 37 and Jamie Longazel, founder of Anthracite Unite in conversation on photography and the Rust Belt Region. The panel will be moderated by Heather Sincavage, Director of Sordoni Art Gallery.

 
 
 

ART BLOCK

SEPTEMBER 20TH | 5 – 8 PM

Live Glass Blowing Demonstrations: Join us at for Third Friday Art Block from 5 to 8 pm at the Sordoni Art Gallery featuring live hot glass demonstrations with the Keystone College Mobile Glass Studio, hands-on art making activities, music, and more!

 
 
 

JAMIE LONGAZEL

SEPTEMBER 20TH | 4:30 - 5:30 PM

Undocumented Fears: Immigration and the Politic of Divide and Conquer in Hazelton, Pennsylvania

The Illegal Immigration Relief Act (IIRA), passed in the small Rustbelt city of Hazleton, Pennsylvania in 2006, was a local ordinance that laid out penalties for renting to or hiring undocumented immigrants and declared English the city’s official language. The notorious IIRA gained national prominence and kicked off a parade of local and state-level legislative initiatives designed to crack down on undocumented immigrants. Longazel uses the debate around Hazleton’s controversial ordinance as a case study that reveals the mechanics of contemporary divide and conquer politics. He shows how neoliberal ideology, misconceptions about Latinx immigrants, and nostalgic imagery of “Small Town, America” led to a racialized account of an undocumented immigrant “invasion,” masking the real story of a city beset by large-scale loss of manufacturing jobs.

Jamie Longazel is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. His recent book, Undocumented Fears: Immigration and the Politics of Divide and Conquer in Hazleton, Pennsylvania (2016, Temple University Press), won the North Central Sociological Association’s 2017 Scholarly Achievement Award. He is also the co-author (with Benjamin Fleury-Steiner) of The Pains of Mass Imprisonment (2013, Routledge). He is also a co- founder of Anthracite Unite, a collective of scholars, artists, and activists working on issues of racial and economic justice in Northeast Pennsylvania.

 
 
 

AIMEE NEWELL, PH.D.

OCTOBER 2ND | 4:30 - 5:30 PM

Mining our History: What We Can Learn from Photos of the Past

The Luzerne County Historical Society has thousands of photos from the 1800s and 1900s documenting all aspects of the past, including coal mining and its effects on the people and the landscape of our area. Join LCHS Executive Director Aimee Newell as she shares some of these mining-related photos and explores what they can teach us about our history, along with how they resonate with the photos in the Rust Belt Biennial.

Aimee Newell is the Executive Director of the Luzerne County Historical Society in Wilkes-Barre, PA. She holds a PhD in History from the University of Massachusetts – Amherst and an MBA from Suffolk University. She has previously worked at the Nantucket Historical Association, Old Sturbridge Village and the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. She is on the board of PA Museums, Pennsylvania’s statewide museum association, and on the steering committee for AASLH’s Small Museums Affinity Group.

 

 

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 Robert (65), Detroit, Michigan (2017)

Robert is turning 66 next month, “if I live that long”. He says: “I believe the lord kept me here for a reason. It has to have something to do with all the stuff I’ve been through.  I was into heavy shit. Sleeping on the streets. Maybe he gave me a second chance... to do better. I am lucky.”

Robert just went through dialysis and is now waiting for a bus to Clemens Street. 

Detroit went from being one of the biggest and richest cities in America to becoming a symbol for everything that went wrong in the Rust Belt. Since 1950, it lost over 60% of its population and in 2013, the city had to file for bankruptcy. It’s also one of the most dangerous cities in the country and dubbed murder capital. You see abandoned factories and empty houses almost everywhere in Detroit: They are a symbol of the evaporation of high-paying blue collar work.
 

“…the stories of the Rust Belt continue to be of singular importance to the greater trajectory of America today.”

It was my great pleasure to be the juror for the first Rust Belt Biennial of 2019. The work submitted presented a wide cross-section of artistic backgrounds, geographical locations, and philosophical approaches to the challenges and beauty of this region. Although winnowing down these submissions to a group of finalists was a challenging task, I ultimately chose the finalists for the emotional richness and aesthetic integrity of their portfolios. I should also mention that there were many other bodies of work, deeply felt and highly charged, which I look forward to seeing in the exhibition to be held at Sordoni Art Gallery.

My heartfelt thanks go out to all those who took the time to contribute their work and look forward to meeting all those who attend the show on September 7th. Lastly, as I reviewed the many submissions, I was once again reaffirmed in my belief that the stories of the Rust Belt continue to be of singular importance to the greater trajectory of America today. My sincere thanks go out to the organizers of this important project and I wish them much continued success in the coming years for this bold endeavor.

Andrew Moore

1ST PLACE

Robert (65), Detroit, Michigan, 2017

Robert (65), Detroit, Michigan, 2017

MATTHEW ABBOTT

WWW.MATTHEWABBOTT.COM.AU

Matthew Abbott is a documentary photographer specializing in humanistic stories and widely recognized for covering social and political issues that define contemporary Australia and the Asia Pacific region. Abbott is a member of the Oculi collective, Australia’s leading cooperative of photographic artists and a regular contributor to The New York Times. He has worked for clients including Der Spiegel, Newsweek, the Washington Post, The Guardian and Geo Magazine. Abbott is the current Oceania representative for the 6x6 World Press Photo Global Talent Program.

WORK STATEMENT:
Six months after the US presidential elections, I started a journey through one of Americas most historic regions, the once-booming Rust Belt, that’s being considered a deciding factor in the rise of Donald Trump. The project documents the everyday life of people in the region: the ones feeling left behind; and the ones pushing hard for a change for the better.

2ND PLACE

Untitled IV, Lockport, New York, 2017

Untitled IV, Lockport, New York, 2017

ALLISON NICHOLS

WWW.ALLISONNICHOLS.PHOTO

Allison Nichols is a visual artist based in New York. She has studied at the Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY Purchase, and earned her MFA from the Rochester Institute of Technology.

WORK STATEMENT:
Lockport was once a vibrant town, brimming with various industries centered around a body of water known as Eighteen Mile Creek. Like many Western New York towns, Lockport was built by industry and decimated by decades of industrial pollution and environmental neglect. Today the creek is designated as a Superfund site by the Environmental Protection Agency. To make these prints, I collected water from the creek to mix with my cyanotype chemistry, which was then applied to the paper surface to create the image. Aesthetically the prints are abstract and mysterious in appearance, representing a metaphor for the toxicity of the site. Since the works are created with materials from the site itself, they too are contaminated and unsafe to handle, creating a toxic poetry, a push and pull between beauty and horror.

3RD PLACE

Excerpts from Summer in Lundsville, Pennsylvania , (Photographed in Northeast Ohio.), 2018

Excerpts from Summer in Lundsville, Pennsylvania , (Photographed in Northeast Ohio.), 2018

MIKE MAJEWSKI

WWW.MIKEMAJEWSKI.COM

Mike Majewski is a photographer and educator based in Northeast Ohio. He creates work encompassing the narrative of place and social structure. Working on dissecting the archetypes and narrative of the post-industrial mid-west. With a combination of written word, sequencing, and photographic objects, his work analyzes the constructs of a region and the social fabric that holds it all together.

WORK STATEMENT:
Summer in Lundsville revolves around a boy named Tommy. The viewer peers through Tommy's eyes as he rides his bike through town. Addressing the landscape and social structures of the Midwest, Tommy grapples with his place in a Pennsylvania steel town.

 

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Eric Kunsman, Palmyra, NY- July 4th 2015, Palmyra, NY, 2015 20 x 20 inches Archival Pigment Print

Eric Kunsman, Palmyra, NY- July 4th 2015, Palmyra, NY, 2015 20 x 20 inches Archival Pigment Print

Eric Kunsman

www.erickunsman.com

This body of work is a visual reference on how technology has influenced anything but growth. We often tend to think that all technology advances us as a society, but often we instantly forget about what has gotten us to the point we are at, as a society and within our lives. In regards to technology, the idea that we are taking one step forward is often leading us to take one step back as a society. Whether that is by monitoring everything that happens in an environment or having the location become abandoned, we are losing our identity. Our society has become one where we are always building new infrastructure, buildings, technology, and advances while just allowing the used objects to be forgotten about or ignored. My images often have a subtle play on whether technology or other societal issues impact the environment one is viewing.

 
John Lusis, Dunkin Donuts Parking Lot, Milwaukee, WI, 2015 20 x 16 inches Archival Inkjet Print

John Lusis, Dunkin Donuts Parking Lot, Milwaukee, WI, 2015 20 x 16 inches Archival Inkjet Print

John Lusis

www.johnlusisphoto.com

The Good Land responds to the architecture of Milwaukee, WI focusing on its downtown and vernacular architecture. Milwaukee has undergone a significant shift in its center and yet there are still parts of its outlying area that are in impoverished. Only recently has there been plans to revitalize its downtown areas which lay vacant at night and often only inhabited during work hours. The West sides of town offer magnificent buildings that have gone in disrepair. Buildings with historic architectural embellishments that lay in ruin. The juxtaposition of these two locations is meant to highlight its disparity while at the same time, celebrate its vernacular architecture that is the heartbeat of the city. The photographs are intended to pose questions about how we should use these spaces and also document the changing Milwaukee landscape.

 
Parker Reinecker, Home, Scranton, Pennsylvania, Scranton, 2014 30 x 24 inches Archival Pigment Print

Parker Reinecker, Home, Scranton, Pennsylvania, Scranton, 2014 30 x 24 inches Archival Pigment Print

Parker Reinecker

www.parkerreineckerphoto.com

"The Then, The Now, The Everything After" is a personal project and part of a series in a personal reflection of small-town America. This volume (1 of 3) is set in Northeastern Pennsylvania, the images work to develop cinematic narratives through the use of contemporary, iconographic symbolism. Being from a valley with a boundary of mountains that most don't have the opportunity to leave, the use of heavy highlights and shadows suggest a concept touching on the good and evil of a place like this. Where dreams are big, but corruption, in many views, can be even bigger. But ideals of faith, tradition and values seem to shine through the darkness.

 
Peter Essick, Steel Mill, Lake Michigan, Gary, Indiana, Gary, Indiana, 2018 26 x 12 inches Archival Pigment Print

Peter Essick, Steel Mill, Lake Michigan, Gary, Indiana, Gary, Indiana, 2018 26 x 12 inches Archival Pigment Print

Peter Essick

www.peteressick.com

The modern environmental movement in the United States began on June 22, 1969 after the Cuyahoga River caught fire as a result of industrial pollution. The next 50 years has not been easy for the people and waters of the Great Lakes. During this period, the region was hit with economic downturns and almost every water body in the region suffered from pollution from past and present industries. In spite of this difficult half-century, the people and landscape of the Great Lakes have proven to be resilient. Plans are in place for a new revival of the region based on new technologies and the strength of character of the people. These aerial photographs, landscapes and portraits highlight a complex but enduring culture and geography at the heart of American history.

 
Emily Najera, 807 Bridge St., Grand Rapids, Michigan, 2018 20 x 20 inches Pigment Print

Emily Najera, 807 Bridge St., Grand Rapids, Michigan, 2018 20 x 20 inches Pigment Print

Emily Najera

www.emilynajera.com

This photograph is part of a collection of work titled West Grand. The series documents a neighborhood located in Northwest Grand Rapids, Michigan. The body of work is a survey of environments that are threatened by new construction and urban redevelopment. The photograph serves as an archive of place, preserving a familiar, yet vulnerable landscape.

 
David Bernstein, Sunday Morning, East Liverpool Ohio, 2018 28 x 20 inches Archival Ink Jet

David Bernstein, Sunday Morning, East Liverpool Ohio, 2018 28 x 20 inches Archival Ink Jet

David Bernstein

www.davidbernsteinphotographer.com

In 1919, Sherwood Anderson published Winesburg, Ohio, a book of intertwined short stories about a fictional town where characters experience the collapse of social institutions that defined small-town America. Like the characters in Winesburg, the inhabitants of Fawcettown — a Rust Belt town of my own creation — search for collective experiences in this time of economic and social trauma. Masculine rituals and religious practices give a sense of identity but the question remains, how real is this manufactured social fabric? Can it overcome the overwhelming interiority and divisiveness that the modern world has created?

 
David Obermeyer, Bridge in Fog, South Chicago, 2017 30 x 20 inches Archival Inkjet

David Obermeyer, Bridge in Fog, South Chicago, 2017 30 x 20 inches Archival Inkjet

 

David Obermeyer

www.davidobermeyer.com

Photography for me has always been a process of discovery. A way of entering and engaging with the world, a visual dialectic between what is seen and what is just beyond. Out of the fog something new emerges.

John Wyatt, Railroad St., Johnstown, PA, Johnstown, PA, 2013 29.5 x 23.38 inches

John Wyatt, Railroad St., Johnstown, PA, Johnstown, PA, 2013 29.5 x 23.38 inches

John Wyatt

www.johnwyatt.net

Throughout childhood, until my early teens, my mother and I would spend summers in Johnstown, PA where our relatives lived. Some of my best memories were times spent in this city. During that period Johnstown was thriving mainly because of production in the steel mills and coal mines. There was a very low crime rate and local businesses were doing well. Decades later when America could no longer compete with foreign countries steelworkers were laid off, mills were closed as were coal mines and much of the population moved to other states to obtain employment. Although there is sadness, for me, in the deteriorating changes in Johnstown I also find beauty in this environment. It offsets the architectural sameness and predictability of much of the rest of America.

 
Raymond Thompson Jr, Appalachian Ghost - Untitled #2, West Virginia, 2018 24 x 30 inches Ink Jet Digital Print

Raymond Thompson Jr, Appalachian Ghost - Untitled #2, West Virginia, 2018 24 x 30 inches Ink Jet Digital Print

Raymond Thompson Jr

www.raymondthompsonjr.com

In the 1930s, migrant laborers came from all over the region to work on the construction of a 3-mile tunnel to divert the New River near Fayetteville, WV. Workers were exposed to pure silica, because of improper drilling techniques. This lead to the death of up to 800 workers. Nearly two thirds of the workers were African American. In part, this moment in history has been erased from the memory of West Virginia. The purpose of my project is to explore visual possibilities of what that time and place looked like using primary source materials such as: victims letters, tunnel construction photographs, news accounts and other written materials to investigate and recreate the workers’ experiences.

 
Tom Lamb, Brush Strokes, Railyards, Chicago, Il, 2015 30 x 24 inches Aerial Photography

Tom Lamb, Brush Strokes, Railyards, Chicago, Il, 2015 30 x 24 inches Aerial Photography

Tom Lamb

www.lambstudio.com

Tom Lamb is a landscape and ethnographic photographer. Through the art of storytelling Tom has dedicated his life to creating memorable photographs and championing environmental awareness. His images, both from the air and the ground, are often of areas in transition or abandoned landscapes. He uses images to examine how we interact with the planet's most valuable and increasingly threatened resources. Tom is interested in the abstract balance between the natural world and man's mark on the land. Lamb's introduction to the art movement, Abstract Expressionism, came while he was a graduate student at the Rhode Island School of Design in the late 1970s and assisting Aaron Siskind known for his own abstract photographic work. Tom's work is published, exhibited and collected internationally.

 
Hans Gindlesberger, Untitled (flags), from the series "I'm in the Wrong Film", New York, 2018 40 x 22 inches Archival Pigment Print

Hans Gindlesberger, Untitled (flags), from the series "I'm in the Wrong Film", New York, 2018 40 x 22 inches Archival Pigment Print

Hans Gindlesberger

wwwgindlesberger.com

I’m in the Wrong Film a semi-real, semi-imagined chronicle of the struggles and psychology of the American small town. The title is a phrase used to indicate disorientation from surroundings that have taken on a disconcerting, fictitious quality. In these tableaus, the experience of individual dislocation the phrase describes is applied more broadly, articulating the collective sense of alienation that has permeated rural America. These anxieties are mimicked in the composition of the photographs themselves, which place a character searching for belonging in front of backdrops that have been artificially composited from an archive of photographs of midwestern towns. This everyman and the fragile, neglected simulations he inhabits explore both the desire and absurdity in attempting to recover a sense of belonging in a time of dislocation.

 
Kylie West, Chester Heights, PA, Chester Heights, PA, 2019 29.125 x 24 inches Ink Jet Print

Kylie West, Chester Heights, PA, Chester Heights, PA, 2019 29.125 x 24 inches Ink Jet Print

Kylie West

www.kyliewestphotography.com

Exploring the Northeast Region of The United States of America, Accidental Memorials examines impoverished communities to foster a dialog about the current state of urban industrial centers and how these working-class neighborhoods have faced a decline in jobs, property values, and ultimately a troubling shift into poverty. The photographs focus on objects and scenes reminiscent of the past seen throughout neighborhoods, vacant lots and back streets where personal effects, furniture, and debris are often casually discarded. These unintentional memorials reflect the erosion of communities, speaking to social and economic impacts of deindustrialize areas along the 95 Corridor. Accidental Memorials is a testament to these struggling towns, their residents, and their past; Traces of what was and what remains, both physically and socially.

 
John Sandarson, Steel Mill and Houses, Lackawanna, New York

John Sandarson, Steel Mill and Houses, Lackawanna, New York

John Sanderson

www.john-sanderson.com

Picturing America is to unfurl a tapestry of exceptionalism -- not the “City upon the Hill” exceptionalism, but a genuine, vestigial kind. As highway began replacing railroad lines in the 1950s, a restructuring of physical and social space began. Suburbs rose and cities suffered. What persists is an illustrative tracery of people and places, rich in their ability to find meaning in transformation.

 
Susan Copich, the fall(RED), Youngstown, Ohio, 2017 45 x 35 inches medium format photography

Susan Copich, the fall(RED), Youngstown, Ohio, 2017 45 x 35 inches medium format photography

Susan Copich

ww.susancopich.com

the fall(RED), part of a larger self-portrait photography series 'then he forgot my name' examining decay and mortality while reflecting the collective awakening of female power set in American Rust Belt darling, Youngstown, Ohio. Several years ago my father was diagnosed with dementia, prompting frequent visits to my hometown. Using a family owned historic building as backdrop, the building yearns to reveal its tales, providing a crucible for conjuring story. Creating characters through researching past tenants (thank you Mahoning Valley Historical Society), inspired by found objects on set as well as the universality of womanhood, replete with its trials, wounds, strengths, tolerances and impossible tasks. Despite it all—amid the ruin—the strength of the woman emerges.

 
Scott Houston, Julie, East Liverpool, Ohio, USA, 2009 17 x 14.5 inches Digital C print

Scott Houston, Julie, East Liverpool, Ohio, USA, 2009 17 x 14.5 inches Digital C print

Scott Houston

www.scotthoustonphoto.com

Julie Hall sits in the bedroom of her mothers house in East Liverpool, Ohio. Julie's grandfather founded the Hall China Company in 1903. Hall China has sold world wide but in 2013 the company had to be sold because of cheaper ceramics from China flooding the market.

 
Alyssha Csuk, Bethlehem Steel Chrome VI, Bethlehem Pennsylvania , 2006 44.5 x 19.5 inches Transparency film, Giclee print

Alyssha Csuk, Bethlehem Steel Chrome VI, Bethlehem Pennsylvania , 2006 44.5 x 19.5 inches Transparency film, Giclee print

Alyssha Eve Csük

www.alysshaevecsuk.com

This image is part of a larger series of Industrial Landscapes all captured with Linhof 617 on fujichrome Velvia 100. Near mostly all things fall to ruin with some form of grace, these industrial landscapses capture the ruins in a light that calls attention to a view different from the repulsive brownfield. Micro to macro, extended views, scale, massiveness, geometry of the landscapes that almost take you from the presented reality of the image to the incipient mystery that ebbs right below the surface that is always lurking - dream-world breaks into reality, just trying to come through but can’t. Sense of strangeness pervades, a surreal-ness, that carries the suspended state, states of suspension in time. A time capsule, if you will. It is pure fascination and curiosity that keeps me pressing forward, half-muting the dark, eerie and unfamiliar vibrations that often permeate industrial ruins.

 

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CONTACT US

 

 

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Support the Rust Belt Biennial by getting this awesome enamel pin. All proceeds go towards funding the event that celebrates photography from the rust belt region.

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